Kayak4Youth Blog Day 6 – Falealupo Beach Fales

Day Six – From Va-i-moana Seaside Lodge in Asau to Falealupo Beach Fales

 

Faataua Le Ola Coordinator Papali'i Carol Ah Chong wishing Andy luck on his Tanoa Tusitala leg of his journey.

Faataua Le Ola Coordinator Papali’i Carol Ah Chong wishing Andy luck on his Tanoa Tusitala leg of his journey

Today I am stuffed. Whoever thought that the shortest part of this journey – the Tanoa Tusitala leg – would be the hardest. I was so pumped at the start of the day I thought I could smash two legs of the voyage – but late into the leg the sea had other plans and I was so glad to see the Falealupo Beach Fales.

Setting out from Va-i-moana Seaside Lodge the weather was again on my side. The conditions were better than we had on the way in due to our early start – but the lack of wind meant I had hours of hard peddling ahead of me.

Luckily a strong wind picked up three hours in and I got a 30 minute burst and flew across the water covering about eight kilometres.

Andy sharing fishing tips with a local fisherman at Falealupo Beach Fales.

Andy sharing fishing tips with a local fisherman at Falealupo Beach Fales

About the time I was rounding Cape Mulinu’u – the most western part of Samoa – a storm came in and I started to feel where the two equatorial currents meet. The kayak was thrown around a bit but I pressed on fairly well and headed out to sea to avoid the cliffs and rocks.

However, the further I paddled out the rougher it got and then it was just mayhem – waves were coming from every direction the current didn’t know which way it wanted to pull me. It was the most frightening part of the trip to date.

It was then I made the call to come into Falealupo. So I turned around and paddled back. The challenge was on then to get past the reef and into the lagoon through the breakers. The support crew were out behind me watching the waves and once a gap opened up they radioed through and I had no choice then but to go. I couldn’t have made that call myself – so thanks guys for pulling me through there.

However, it wasn’t over there – once I was through I had to fight, pulling up my centerboard, the peddles and the rudder. Once that was sorted I pretty much surfed my way into Falealupo Beach where I just missed hitting a rather large rock.

Crew: Andy, Documentary Director Andrew McLean and Australian Youth Ambassador for Development David Guest – relaxing after what turned out to be a hard day.

Crew: Andy, Documentary Director Andrew McLean and Australian Youth Ambassador for Development David Guest – relaxing after what turned out to be a hard day

It was a miracle the kayak didn’t hit the rock because at that stage with no steering I couldn’t control it. When I finally regained some control I jumped out and straight into coral which resulted in my foot being cut up pretty badly.

Falealupo Beach Fales were a welcome sight. As soon as I docked, I tethered my Kayak and tended to the first casualty of this journey – my ankle.

When everything calmed down I had the chance to take in the surroundings of where I had landed. The sheer remoteness of it was beautiful. Here, I had finally made it to the most western part of Samoa – Falealupo – the sunset village.

With a few hours up my sleeve I used the time to do some fishing (I even got some tips from a local – awesome!) and relax with my crew.

Now time for a good night’s rest before I set out on day 6 – Falealupo to Satuiatua.

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